Just because you can ..

Sometimes you need to do something just because you can. Well after setting up a multi-boot OS, the question became how many could you run at the same time. Well the current limit is about 6 – mostly based on screen real estate.
Just because you can (2)

Sometimes you need to do something just because you can. Well after setting up a multi-boot OS, the question became how many could you run at the same time. Well the current limit is about 6 – mostly based on screen real estate.
Just because you can (2)

The current idea is to evaluate the new VMWare product against the Parallels application that I have been using for about a year. The existing Windows XP install, as well as a previous Suse install are both in Parallels. Vista was installed in Parallels, mainly for the more mature driver support.
Just because you can (1)

The VMware was used for the UNIX OSes, mainly because of the 64bit support and the ability to provide multiple virtual processors. It will be interesting to see if this yield performance results. As shown here, The VMWare tool has taken advantage of some of the ‘Mac Stuff’. The use of a ‘package'(top left – below) to hide the bits and pieces of the Virtual machine (bottom right – below):
VMWare v Parallels 3
Is nicer than the Parallels presentation
VMWare v Parallels 1

VMWare v Parallels 2

– but this is purely esthetics – but a good chunk of being a Mac app is good esthetics.

Quad boot – Octo Mac Pro, Part IV

To paraphrase Sean Connery (from the Hunt for Red October) … “once again we play our dangerous game against our old adversary” ….. Installing Windows Vista on the Mac Pro.
Apple install

To paraphrase Sean Connery (from the Hunt for Red October) … “once again we play our dangerous game against our old adversary” ….. Installing Windows Vista on the Mac Pro.
Apple install

The basic install of Windows Vista was uneventful, althought it did required about 4 reboots and about 1 hour to complete. Once the install was complete the functionality, including things like Aero Glass were there without any special work. To get the drivers specific to the Apple hardware (especially thing like wireless and bluetooth) I did install the drivers from the current version of the Boot Camp Assistant

The Vista installation was based on the 32-bit version which still is likely the common version deployed. The benefits of the 64-bit version (other than addressing the memory issue mentioned earlier is not really clear.
Not enough RAM

Vista does recognize the 8 processor cores and appears to use all reasonably well.
Vista Task Manager

After running the Performance test under Vista the score ended up at 4.0. This actually went down fom 4.3 after initial install due to poorer graphics performance. Leading me to believe the native Windows drivers did better with the 7300GT NVidia card than the Apple drivers installed by boot camp.

Performance

So with Mac OS 10.4, 10.5, Windows XP and Vista the Mac Pro is now capable of the Quad booting operating systems. It will be interesting to see which one (if any) produces better performance.

But next … OS madness with Parallels and VMware in the OS within and OS department.

Quad boot – Octo Mac Pro, Part III

The installation of OS X 10.5 was without drama. Unfortunately , the post-installation was also without any drama – you kinda wanted Zing after a new OS. The result was a slightly slicker version of 10.4. There are a couple of noteable additions to the interface. The menu bar now boasts an eject button. Just to the right of the ‘Spaces’ (Virtual Desktop) selection
Leopard w/Spaces

The installation of OS X 10.5 was without drama. Unfortunately , the post-installation was also without any drama – you kinda wanted Zing after a new OS. The result was a slightly slicker version of 10.4. There are a couple of noteable additions to the interface. The menu bar now boasts an eject button. Just to the right of the ‘Spaces’ (Virtual Desktop) selection
Leopard w/Spaces
I guess the ‘dragging disks to the trash’ metaphor finally wore a little thin.

The Desktop shows a use of 3-D effects all over, most notable in the dock Leopard Dock

So without revisiting all the items that have been covered elsewhere, on to the Boot Camp stuff.

In preparation for the Windows Vista install I ran the BootCamp assistant. I specifically wanted to try the partitioning utility.
Boot Camp3

This did successfully partition the 250GB drive to allow a 75GB parition for the Windows install. Then boot the installer for Windows.
Boot Camp3

Quad boot – Octo Mac Pro, Part II

The inital installs of Windows on the Mac Pro was successful. Unfortunately the Windows XP installation only recognized 2 of the 5GB installed. Apparently this is a known issue in Windows XP. Other than that issue Windows XP recognizes most of the hardware on the Mac Pro including all the Windows readable partitions on the harddrives attached to the system. The video, keyboard, DVD burner, and all connections; network, USB, and FW are supported.

The inital installs of Windows on the Mac Pro was successful. Unfortunately the Windows XP installation only recognized 2 of the 5GB installed. Apparently this is a known issue in Windows XP. Other than that issue Windows XP recognizes most of the hardware on the Mac Pro including all the Windows readable partitions on the harddrives attached to the system. The video, keyboard, DVD burner, and all connections; network, USB, and FW are supported.

Since the goal here is to create a full multi-boot system, the next step was to look for the next generation of OSes. The Mac Pro is now running OS X (10.4) and Windows XP (SP2). So what’s next …. Vista and Leopard

So while I’m in Windows XP, I thought it would be fun to run the Vista Upgrade Advisor.

The upgrade advisor didn’t have much to say about my hardware, as much of it didn’t seem to be recognized. It complained about Nero but the rest was viewed as okay.

Again the upgrade advisor (like XP) only sees the 2GB of memory. But even under Vista my 5GB of RAM is wasted

From http://support.microsoft.com/kb/929605/en-us Title: The system memory that is reported in the System Information dialog box in Windows Vista is less than you expect if 4 GB of RAM is installed

“The reduction in available system memory depends on the devices that are installed in the computer. However, to avoid potential driver compatibility issues, the 32-bit versions of Windows Vista limit the total available memory to 3.12 GB.”

Next …. installing the next cat